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Meadowlands bans feeding of large pellets

Coventry's Meadowlands Fishery has banned the feeding of large pellets on its main Lamsdown Lake after anglers complained that fishing at the venue was becoming 'too one-dimensional'. The move follows a similar ban two years ago on the smaller Warren Pool.

Jack Harness, co-owner of Meadowlands, says the fishery has banned the use of 6mm and 8mm pellets on the grounds that visiting matchmen and pleasure anglers were getting fed up of having to fish at long range just to get bites. The experimental ban will stay in place until April 2016 after which anglers will only be permitted to use 1kg of 8mm pellets per session.

Jack Harness told 'Angling Times': "Everyone who came here before this ruling was put in place fished the bomb at 30 yards or more, and anglers were catapulting pellets to feed the fish - so that's where they would always be and weights were suffering because of it."

"Banning these sizes of pellets stops anglers being able to catapult feed at that range. I haven't just done this on a whim, as I first consulted other fisheries and top anglers."

"I think it's the right thing to do to improve sport here. I also think it will help to improve fish welfare, as the large pellets take over a day to break down, which isn't good for the water or fish digestion," he added.

The ruling, which still allows the use of 6mm and 8mm pellets as a hookbait, brought mixed reactions on social media, but many top anglers have already voiced their support of the ban including top matchman and venue regular Joe Carass. He told 'Angling Times': "It seems to be a trend sweeping across the UK on venues with plenty of open water that anglers are feeding the fish at range and making it impossible to catch closer in. I wouldn't be surprised if other venues soon follow suit."

The fishery hopes the ban will encourage the fish will feed closer in, allowing weights to improve among anglers who fish the pole and traditional waggler techniques.


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